To contact Gika Rector, call 713.213.7643 or send e-mail.

Upcoming Events

Past Events

Practice Towards Mastery

I’ve been running a little experiment lately. After reading about mastery and taking a couple of drawing classes, I still don’t like the way I draw. Reading about mastery did nothing for my drawing, but it did encourage practicing. So, I’ve been practicing. Almost every morning, I start my day with a practice that Julia Cameron calls “morning pages”. Before you read or check your email or listen to the news, you sit down and write three pages. Three pages about whatever comes to mind, no matter how serious, silly, redundant or irrelevant. When I start my day with morning pages, somehow the day goes better.coffee

Several weeks ago I added a practice. At the end of the writing, I draw my coffee cup. It’s always there. It has a simple shape and so it shouldn’t be that difficult to draw. I usually spend only about 5 minutes on the drawing, because I’m not yet patient enough to take more time with it. I’ve learned enough to know that I have a lot to learn—and not just about drawing. But here’s the good news: this morning’s rendering looks a little better than yesterday’s. It’s not quite as lopsided as previous versions, and something about the handle is beginning to look more like a handle. …more

Seeking Clarity in the Tangled Threads

threads

This year hasn’t worked out the way I planned. My family lost two little lives before they even had a chance to truly begin. A business venture fizzled into frustration and disappointment. An intimate relationship broke into a distant friendship. A dear friend moved across the country—still a cherished friend, but distant geographically. An elder in our family moved geographically nearby, but dementia seems to widen the gap between us—or between us and who she used to be. …more

Moving Forward: Slow Down, You Move Too Fast

Date and time

Saturday, August 24, 2013
1–3 p.m.

Description

speed_blur_smDo you find yourself running around like a crazy person? Peddling as fast as you can? August in Texas is the perfect opportunity to slow down, be lazy and take a look at the speed of your life. Stepping back for a different perspective and changing your tempo can give your body—and your life—a fresh start.

Join Gika Rector for this gentle exploration of setting your tempo—physically and metaphorically. This two-hour workshop focuses on fun and easy ways to move your body and your life. What might be possible if you could set your own pace, sometimes slow and lazy, sometimes fast and powerful?

The workshop will include group interactions/conversations, quiet time for individual reflection and a specially selected Awareness Through Movement® lesson.

Fee

Early bird before August 20 is $30; after August 20, $35

How to register

Registration is available online here or at the door.
Send email to Gika or call her at 713-213-7643, or send email to Jen for further information.

Registration is closed for this event.

Location

Pilates Place Yoga Space of the Woodlands
30420 FM 2978
The Woodlands, TX  77354

Group Coaching with Gika Recto

Date and time

Wednesday, June 13, 2012
7–9 p.m.

Description

Feeling stuck? Ready to make a change? Curious about life coaching?

Flying

I’d rather be flying!

Sometimes it’s as simple as “One foot in front of the other. One step at a time.” Other times you need a little extra clarity and support. Group coaching is a great first step.

With a combination of individual reflection, gentle movement, and interactive exercises, Gika will get you moving in new directions.

Take an evening for you, an opportunity to explore where you are, where you’d like to be, and how to get there.

Fee

Early bird price $45
$50 after June 7

Location

How to register

Registration is closed for this event.

 

Some Days Are Foggy

Some days are foggySome days are foggy. Flights get cancelled. Traffic slows down. Meetings are postponed. Not much choice: ready or not, life slows down. We usually don’t like it when we’re forced to slow down. We’ve got places to go and things to do, and we don’t like interference. But every now and then, it’s nice to slow down and “feel your way” through an experience.

Explaining his work in the field of human functioning and self-awareness, Moshe Feldenkrais, founder of the Feldenkrais Method, invoked the Weber-Fechner law, which attempts to describe the relationship between the magnitudes of stimuli and our ability to perceive differences among them. He asserted that at a slower pace, with smaller movements—on a foggy day, maybe—we can get more clarity. If we slow down enough to pay attention, we can learn something new about how we move, how we put one foot in front of the other, what it takes to get us moving, how we find our way in a confusing environment.

Coaching is useful on those foggy days. Something interferes with your life and you need to get your bearings. Coaching can bring some light—not the high beams that bounce off the fog and create glare, but the low beams that focus on the ground right in front of you, the ground you might otherwise not have noticed. In coaching, we look at how you move, what propels you forward, and what slows you down. As daylight increases and burns away the fog, you can move forward with greater ease and grace because of what you’ve learned.

What’s interfering in your life? What creates the fog? Where might you shine some light and learn to move a little easier?

Have I told you lately…?

Telling storiesHave I told y’all lately that I love coaching? Well, I do. I love it. I get to listen to people’s stories—the stories they want to tell, the ones they’re afraid to tell, the ones they need to tell. Sometimes I share some of my stories. Sometimes I ask questions—okay, I always ask questions.

And in the process of telling stories, listening to stories, and asking and answering questions, new stories emerge and lives are changed. These stories are not fairy tales, where our heroes ride off into the sunset and live happily ever after. These are real lives and real stories in which people move in new ways and in new directions. They live more happily, and the people around them get happier, too.

Thank you to all of you who help me to do what I love to do.

Cleaning Up Along the Way

It should be obvious. Cleaning up along the way makes sense, a lot of sense.

It’s so nice to complete a project and have it really complete. When you sit down to dinner, what a delight to have the kitchen already neat and tidy. When you spend time in the garden and allocate the last 10 or 20 minutes to put away your tools, you earn a moment to step back and admire your work.

Mardi Gras debris
After the parade
by Gika Rector

Whether your office is a place at the kitchen counter or an entire room, what a difference it can make when you clean up along the way. It’s the difference between a clear, clean workspace and a disastrous mountain of paper. Even when you go paperless, it helps to clean up along the way. A sea of computer files can be just as overwhelming as a mountain of papers.

And what about our personal interactions? Thomas Leonard, the father of modern coaching, said, “When someone is doing something…you must communicate immediately or forever carry the extra burden of your unspoken reaction.” How many people or groups of people do you avoid because of something you didn’t clean up along the way? …more