To contact Gika Rector, call 713.213.7643 or send e-mail.

Upcoming Events

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Past Events

Illumination in the Midst of Famine

Food in the midst of famine. Where does it come from? Who gets to have it? Who might be willing to share?

And where’s the famine? Here we are in the land of plenty. Seems like there’s more talk of obesity than famine. And yet, there’s also a pervasive sense of limited resources; certainly there are hungry people in our community, and plenty of doubt about the economy and the job situation.

Even Cowgirls Get the Blues

I recently started a Meetup Group called The Well-fed Artist, and the theme for our first meeting is “Food in the Midst of Famine.” How’s that for putting it out there? In all my life up to this point, I’ve never known so many artists. None of them are literally starving—at least to my knowledge—but a lot of them are hungry. Hungry for success, for acknowledgement, for a way to do what they do and get paid for doing it, for money to pay the rent, for time and space and resources to make their art, for a sense of security, and for encouragement and inspiration.

In all my life up to this point, I don’t remember ever hearing such a consistent litany about the perils of our current economic situation. So why, at this point, should we talk about the well-fed artist? Shouldn’t we move on to more practical things, like jobs and politics and tightening our belts? Maybe; maybe not. In the midst of all the gloom and doom, it’s artists who tell it like it is, and also get really creative about new possibilities. It’s artists who help us see the world and ourselves in new light. It’s artists who help us tap into the stuff we know, but don’t know that we know. It’s artists who express the feelings we’re not quite ready to admit to. It’s artists who show us the best and the worst in us and in our world. It’s artists who remind us that “man can not live by bread alone.” Artists are necessary to our well being, and they should be well-fed. That’s why I think we should talk about the well-fed artist.

So, what does it mean to be a well-fed artist? As a starting point, I’d say that the well-fed artist has food on the table, clothing and shelter, and time and space and resources for making art. Easily said, not always so easily created. Thus, the meetup group. We’ll tell it like it is and like it could be. We’ll share ideas and information, food and nourishment. We’ll look at the complications and obstacles to being well-fed. Could it be that Tom Robbins was right when he said, “Difficulties illuminate existence, but they must be fresh and of high quality.”?*

Let the illumination begin.

*Even Cowgirls Get the Blues

Art Talk Sundays: Tips and Techniques for Applying to Festivals
September 2010

Date and time

Sunday, September 19, 2010
1 pm

Description

Woodlands Art LeagueThe Woodlands Art League has announced a new, regularly scheduled free event called Art Talk Sundays. The series will feature artist tips, discussions, and information on any and all things art-related.

Gika Rector will be the guest speaker at the first Art Talk Sunday. She’ll offer advice on applying to art festivals. Gika has worked for The Woodlands Waterway Arts Festival in artist relations and artist management, and she serves on the board of The Woodlands Waterway Art Council. She’ll share her experience and knowledge with local artists. Gika will discuss how to decide which festivals are right for you, how to navigate the application process, and more.

With the WWAF application deadline coming in October, this will be a timely and informative session!

Fee

Art Talk Sundays are FREE and open to the public.

Location

Woodlands Art League Gallery
9595 Six Pines, Suite 1370 [MAP]
The Woodlands, TX 77380

Instructor

A fiber artist for more than 20 years, Gika Rector combines creativity, an education in psychology, and her role as a personal coach to facilitate transformation in individuals and organizations more

The Well-fed Artist: To Show or Not To Show, That Is the Question
September 2010

Announcing the second meeting of The Well-fed Artist, a Meetup group intended to subvert the idea that artists have to starve, to suffer for their art. Artists can and do live rich, full lives. How? What does it take? How can they provide nourishment for themselves and one another?

Hosted by coach and fiber artist Gika Rector, this Meetup group explores what it takes individually and as a community to be well-fed.

Date and time

Two birds high in treeThursday, September 9, 2010
7–9 pm

Description

Each meeting of The Well-fed Artist will be loosely structured around a theme, and will also include time for individual reflection and conversation.

The theme for our second meeting will be To Show or Not To Show, That Is the Question. Members of The Well-fed Artist have suggested a show, so we’ll talk about showing our work. What is and isn’t important about doing that? Is the work complete without being shown? What’s the right setting for showing your work, or your work at this time?

Participants are invited to bring something to share—a snack, an idea, or a show-and-tell.

Fee

The Well-fed Artist meetups are FREE and open to the public, but we encourage you to join the group and RSVP for events at the Meetup page. Group membership is free and entitles you to participate in the discussion forums, share messages with the community, and sign up for announcements about other Meetup groups in your areas of interest.

How to register

Registration is closed for this event.

RSVP by visiting the Meetup page or by sending us e‑mail.

Location

Frame Craft Lampros Gallery
26106 Oakridge Drive [MAP]
The Woodlands, TX 77380

Moderator

A fiber artist for more than 20 years, Gika Rector combines creativity, an education in psychology, and her role as a personal coach to facilitate transformation in individuals and organizations more

Creative Play: A Felting Mini‑Workshop
September 2010

Have fun making your own felt goods in this workshop.

Date and time

Felt around a ballTuesday, September 7, 2010
6–9 pm

Description

Learn a fun and contemporary approach to an ancient fiber medium. Wrap a ball with luscious and colorful merino wool and cover it with pantyhose. Add soap and water—and bounce. The wool becomes a felted sphere. The sphere can then become a bag or purse or vessel, perhaps even a hat.

With vibrant and interesting textures to play with, felting is a rich creative experience for the senses. Bring an old towel, a plastic bag, and your curiosity. All other materials are included in the registration fee. No experience necessary.

Fee

$45 ($40 Jung Center members)

How to register

Registration is closed for this event.

You may register online for this course.

Or if you prefer, you may call The Jung Center at 713‑524‑8253 to register for this event. You can also download a registration form to fill out and fax (713‑524‑8096) or mail to the Jung Center.

Location

The Jung Center of Houston
5200 Montrose Boulevard [MAP]
Houston, Texas
713-524-8253

Instructor

A fiber artist for more than 20 years, Gika Rector combines creativity, an education in psychology, and her role as a personal coach to facilitate transformation in individuals and organizations more

A Simple Thank-you Will Do Quite Nicely

Menil Magnolias
Menil Magnolias
by Gika Rector

I paid for someone’s dinner the other night, and she thanked me kindly. I made a trip to help someone with a daunting chore. She thanked me for coming, even before we got started on the work. Nicely done, and what a difference it made. Being acknowledged for doing something helpful or nice adds to the quality of the exchange. Makes it a little more worthwhile.

These experiences put me in mind of another situation, in which I’ve been both acknowledged and rebuffed. The acknowledgements help me move forward; the other stuff makes me wonder if it’s worth it, which in turn means it takes that much more energy to do what I do there.

So here’s what I want to say about this: please thank others for what they do. And if you disagree with what they do, it’s okay to communicate that. Please, just include appreciation for the efforts they make, and do it with respect and courtesy. It’ll make the world a nicer place—at least your corner of the world, for a little while.

And please let me know what kind of experiences you’ve had with expressions of gratitude. What kind of results are you noticing? Oh—and thanks for reading.